Just say “No Straws, Please” [There, That Wasn’t So Hard!]

With apologies to the companies around the world that make straws, we need to break up. Let me explain:

Plastic Oceans gets it. There are Texas-sized gyres of garbage floating around our oceans. That’s our fault. They’re not entirely comprised of straws, but just like sorting our recycling, saying “no straw please” when in restaurants may literally be the least we can do to combat our unhealthy relationship with plastic.

Do you know who gets it beyond Plastic Oceans? Vancouver’s new amazing, inspired social enterprise, Zero Waste Market.

The get it so much that they’re promoting tonight’s screening of A Plastic Ocean in Vancouver. And they’re demonstrating what makes them awesome as a market.

You can RSVP here, it’s free!

Ultimately, when people are harmonizing and optimizing their work-life-vocation-volunteering balance, which is the core of Path Consulting, it’s easy to skip the straws. It’s easy to align our working lives with our values.

And organizationally, when we have a pretty high bar for progressive values that improve the world, through a social enterprise or otherwise, it can be pretty simple to ensure our activities and our broad stakeholder relationships do more than just ensure sustainable economic activity!

It’s easy to be impressed with Zero Waste Market. I was last month. And you will be too.

Go see the screening tonight. And begin the trend among your people to make “no straw please” go viral!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

Social Innovation Hub Inspiration, 5/5

GRAINWelcome to part 5 of 5!

Last Wednesday I spent the evening being rather impressed with a number of social enterprise groups at the Social Innovation Hub, run by UBC and Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

In a world where it’s hard to pin down a non-cynical definition of “social enterprise,” Wednesday night was refreshingly simple. Each enterprise was deeply personable. Each had their story, a compelling narrative that resonated with the audience. Each knows that in the 21st century, we are increasingly more aware of the values inherent in our consumption. We gravitate towards those who share our values and away from those incapable of expressing values.

This week, I’m going to share with you the 5 groups who presented last week. I love what each of them is doing. And you likely will too!

Fifth up on Wednesday night was…

Who: EatGrain
What: Dry Goods For Fresh People. We bring a fresh approach to dry goods. All Canadian.
Web: https://www.eatgrain.ca/
Contact/Mailing List: https://www.eatgrain.ca/pages/contact
Twitter: https://twitter.com/eatgrain

Promo: Grain sources, sells and mills 100 per cent Canadian grains and beans, aiming to reconnect customers with the sources of their dry goods. GRAIN rejects conventional practices of processing, storage and distribution.

  1. Because family farms matter and it’s hard for us to individually get direct connection to those making our staples.
  2. We can’t raise the bar on improving the ingredients in our life without knowing more about sourcing, processing, storage and distribution.
  3. Because learning the stories of individual farmers expands our interconnected narratives.

And for context, below are my tweets and retweets from the night. Enjoy!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

Social Innovation Hub Inspiration, 4/5

Welcome to part 4 of 5!

Last Wednesday I spent the evening being rather impressed with a number of social enterprise groups at the Social Innovation Hub, run by UBC and Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

In a world where it’s hard to pin down a non-cynical definition of “social enterprise,” Wednesday night was refreshingly simple. Each enterprise was deeply personable. Each had their story, a compelling narrative that resonated with the audience. Each knows that in the 21st century, we are increasingly more aware of the values inherent in our consumption. We gravitate towards those who share our values and away from those incapable of expressing values.

This week, I’m going to share with you the 5 groups who presented last week. I love what each of them is doing. And you likely will too!

Fourth up on Wednesday night was…

Who: ChopValue
What: Because someone DID figure out what to do with all those used chopsticks!
Web: https://chopvalue.ca/
Contact/Mailing List: https://chopvalue.ca/contact/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChopValue

Promo: ChopValue Manufacturing creates innovative composite materials using recycled chopsticks. Developed by Felix Böck a UBC PhD student in the Faculty of Forestry, ChopValue aims to remove more than 100,000 disposable chopsticks that are sent to Vancouver’s landfill every day in order to give urban waste a second chance.

  1. Clever replacements for waste are too rare. When one comes around, we need to embrace it.
  2. I’m not vain, but a custom-engraved, recycled chopstick yoga block sounds good to me, and as a gift too for my fellow yoga freaks.
  3. Their team is as creatively diverse as their ideas. I’ve always been a sucker for supporting BC’s value-added wood sector. This is just too easy! 🙂

And for context, below are my tweets and retweets from the night. Enjoy!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

Social Innovation Hub Inspiration, 3/5

Welcome to part 3 of 5!

Last Wednesday I spent the evening being rather impressed with a number of social enterprise groups at the Social Innovation Hub, run by UBC and Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

In a world where it’s hard to pin down a non-cynical definition of “social enterprise,” Wednesday night was refreshingly simple. Each enterprise was deeply personable. Each had their story, a compelling narrative that resonated with the audience. Each knows that in the 21st century, we are increasingly more aware of the values inherent in our consumption. We gravitate towards those who share our values and away from those incapable of expressing values.

This week, I’m going to share with you the 5 groups who presented last week. I love what each of them is doing. And you likely will too!

Third up on Wednesday night was…

Who: Quupe
What: Item lending? Life is better when you share it
Web: https://quupe.com
Contact/Mailing List: https://quupe.com/FAQ.html
Twitter: https://twitter.com/quupe_inc

Promo: Quupe (“koop”) is an online rental platform that provides users a way to rent things from their neighbours. Founded by four master’s students from the Centre for Digital Media, Quupe started with the realization that people have valuable things in their homes that sit around gathering dust, and now they want to get stuff out of storage and into the world, for everybody to own it.

  1. The iconic kayak bought one summer, used 8 times, then…dust, guilt, calculating how much you lose when you put it on Craigslist? This.
  2. For me, socializing the logistics and creating a structure to protect owners from damage…this is critical.
  3. Landfill, ugh.

And for context, below are my tweets and retweets from the night. Enjoy!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

Social Innovation Hub Inspiration, 2/5

Welcome to part 2 of 5!

Last Wednesday I spent the evening being rather impressed with a number of social enterprise groups at the Social Innovation Hub, run by UBC and Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

In a world where it’s hard to pin down a non-cynical definition of “social enterprise,” Wednesday night was refreshingly simple. Each enterprise was deeply personable. Each had their story, a compelling narrative that resonated with the audience. Each knows that in the 21st century, we are increasingly more aware of the values inherent in our consumption. We gravitate towards those who share our values and away from those incapable of expressing values.

This week, I’m going to share with you the 5 groups who presented last week. I love what each of them is doing. And you likely will too!

Second up on Wednesday night was…

Who: Meatme
What: Meat…farm to table made easy
Web: https://www.meatme.ca/
Contact/Mailing List: https://www.meatme.ca/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MeatmeCA

PromoMeatme is an online marketplace for consumers to connect with local farmers for healthy and honest meat. The company crowdfunds whole animals, then works with local butchers and logistic partners to deliver meat straight to customers’ doors.

  1. One of the best lines of the night: “the Tinder for farm-to-table meat consumption.”
  2. Cow/chicken/hog shares are a great idea, but if you don’t have one of those really big freezers, Meatme crowdsources the meat shares.
  3. If you have been wanting to develop deeper relationships with those who provide our food, it just got so much more logistically easier.

And for context, below are my tweets and retweets from the night. Enjoy!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

Social Innovation Hub Inspiration, 1/5

Zero Waste MarketLast Wednesday I spent the evening being rather impressed with a number of social enterprise groups at the Social Innovation Hub, run by UBC and Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

In a world where it’s hard to pin down a non-cynical definition of “social enterprise,” Wednesday night was refreshingly simple. Each enterprise was deeply personable. Each had their story, a compelling narrative that resonated with the audience. Each knows that in the 21st century, we are increasingly more aware of the values inherent in our consumption. We gravitate towards those who share our values and away from those incapable of expressing values.

This week, I’m going to share with you the 5 groups who presented last week. I love what each of them is doing. And you likely will too!

First up on Wednesday night was…

Who: Zero Waste Market
What: A market with no waste, because we all know packaging is out of control
Web: http://www.zerowastemarket.ca/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/zerowastemarket
Contact/Mailing List: http://www.zerowastemarket.ca/contact/

Promo: Brianne Miller founded Zero Waste Market to combine her background as a marine mammal biologist and her passion for tackling food waste and plastic pollution, on container at a time! Zero Waste Market is transforming the way people shop for groceries by building a 100 per cent package-free retail model. At Zero Waste Market, customers bring their own reusable containers to purchase local, organic and ethically sourced whole foods and home items.

  1. If you know about the garbage patches floating around our oceans, this.
  2. If you are already into the mode of saying No Thank You to straws in restaurants, this.
  3. If you are sorting your recyclables and composting and find that your “garbage” back is almost entirely non-recyclable plastic, then this.

And for context, below are my tweets and retweets from the night. Enjoy!

I’m at ebStrategy.org.

(In)secure: the Future of Working, A Tyee/SFU Joint

We're not in Kansas anymore!
We’re not in Kansas anymore!

(In)secure: the Future of Working, a Tyee/SFU joint on May 25 examined the nature of the precariat. I had many thoughts!

As individuals and organizations we need to become far more intentional about the nature of work, relationships, fulfillment and the social contract.

THAT is why I’m a Path Consultant and an Organizational Soul Consultant.

Here are my tweets from last night. Do they resonate with you? Then we need to talk. We need to build a game plan for you or your organization to make this a more intentional century for you. Plus, as an added bonus, you’ll have a real advantage over people who don’t really understand all this yet.

Call me. I’m at ebStrategy.org.